Political Prose
Best of In The Fray 2013

Best of In The Fray 2013

Out of everything we published this year, our editors chose the following pieces from each section for being standouts among their peers. As we see it, they best represent what In The Fray is all about: stories that further our understanding of other people and encourage empathy and compassion.

Click here to read our best commentary, news, photo essay, culture, and blog pieces from 2013.

Support Stories of Inspiration and Change

Support Stories of Inspiration and Change

I am writing to ask you for your support. For twelve years, In The Fray has published stories that further our understanding of other people and encourage empathy and compassion. The staff work hard — for me and others, on a strictly volunteer basis — to bring you original reporting, photo essays, personal narratives, and reviews that we think are timely and compelling on a global scale.

Our small nonprofit urgently needs your help to continue our mission to be a forum for real, honest discussion and provocative, informed storytelling.

‘Two Fragile Souls in the City’: Contributor Joshunda Sanders at TEDCity2.0

‘Two Fragile Souls in the City’: Contributor Joshunda Sanders at TEDCity2.0

In The Fray contributing writer Joshunda Sanders recently spoke at TEDCity2.0, a conference focused on the challenges and innovations that cities across the world are experiencing today. Joshunda gave a moving talk about her mother's struggle with mental illness (a story she also told for our blog), and the ways that cities can help, and hinder, the lives of the mentally ill — particularly those who are poor and homeless. There are compelling reasons, Joshunda says, that so many homeless individuals congregate in cities.

Violence against Women: An In The Fray Retrospective for International Women’s Day

To celebrate International Women's Day, tonight In The Fray tweeted links from stories we've published over the past decade that relate to violence against women. We joined thousands of other individuals and groups in a twenty-four-­hour, global tweet-­a-thon to raise awareness about gender-­based violence. In case you were asleep during our time slot, here are the links we tweeted:

Breaking the Silence, by April D. Boland

When Rape Becomes Normal, by Anna Sussman and Jonathan Jones

Naked Feminists: A Conversation with Director Louisa Achille, by Laura Nathan-Garner

Gender Outlaws, by Emily Alpert

Genocide Is Not a Spectator Sport, by Anustup Nayak

Sisters of Fate, by Sarah Marian Seltzer

Look below the fold for the tweets.

Best of In The Fray 2012

Best of In The Fray 2012

My apologies for the procrastination — it's an occupational hazard of volunteer work — but here are the editors' picks for the best articles published in In The Fray magazine in 2012. (Actually, since December 2011, when we relaunched the site after a year's hiatus.)

Commentary: The Road Less Traveled, by Lita Wong

News: Freed, but Scarred, by Francesca Crozier-Fitzgerald

Photo Essay: Capitalism Reborn: An East African Story, by Jonathan Kalan

Review: Havel: An Authentic Life, by Jan Vihan

If you like the thoughtful, empathetic journalism that we believe these articles represent, please consider making a donation to In The Fray. Any amount helps. Thanks for your support!

The Good, the Bad, and the Tax-Deductible

The Good, the Bad, and the Tax-Deductible

Check out Rob York's new piece, Born This Way, about an American pastor who, from a barroom pulpit in Seoul, preaches a message of Christian love and acceptance of homosexuality, leading his mostly gay congregation in a David-and-Goliath struggle against South Korea's conservative Christian establishment. Also featured on the site is The Chicago Way, an essay by Nicole Cipri about the long and brazen history of corruption in that city — a “place so crooked,” the Chicago Tribune once lamented, that “even the reformers are on the take.” If you like these or the other stories we've featured throughout the year, please consider making a tax-deductible donation to our nonprofit, which very much needs your support to continue publishing into the new year. Happy holidays!

American Idols

The stories recently featured on the site — The Grapes of Graft by Karen Schaefer, Guitar Hero by Cherise Fong, and The Cajun Cellist by Eli Epstein — have something to say about virtues often forgotten in today's competitive, frenzied society: humility, patience, hard work with no immediate gratification.

New York Times columnist David Brooks has made the case that today's society has lost the sense of humility that once tempered the greatness of the Greatest Generation. Even on the day that the Allies defeated Japan, what was striking was the absence of gloating, Brooks says. Public pronouncements conveyed humility, a simple gladness that the suffering had ended, and a rejection of the tempting belief that the victors were God's chosen.

Don't Save the Planet

Don’t Save the Planet

In ITF's interview with Andrew Blackwell, the author of the book Visit Sunny Chernobyl talks about his travels to the world's most polluted places. One point he raises is that there's no way to return the environment to the "pure, pre-human phase" of its existence — and that this is a misguided ideal to begin with.

Perhaps it says something about humanity's self-centered view of the world that the catchphrase for the environmental movement is "save the planet." Planet Earth doesn't need saving. If life can survive in the pitch-dark, pitiless abyss of the deep ocean, or recolonize remote islands after volcanic explosions wipe the landscape clean, or — as Blackwell points out — thrive in irradiated zones where human beings now fear to tread, then you can imagine that life will eventually adapt to whatever nightmare scenario Homo sapiens visits on its terrestrial neighborhood.

The Center Cannot Hold

The Center Cannot Hold

The stories now featured on the site touch on many issues, but one theme they have in common is the role that religion plays in driving people to get passionately involved politics and activism — and how difficult it is to find secular ways to kindle the same fire. In Saving Souls, Benjamin Gottlieb profiles an enterprising humanitarian group that is busily educating poor children in Delhi's slums. But the work of COI and other evangelical Christian groups continues to draw controversy in India, a once-colonized nation now booming economically and working mightily to assert its own cultural identity. In Losing Zion, Rob York reviews the book The Crisis of Zionism, which argues that the two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is dying, ruined by extremism in Israel and the apathy of the liberal American Jews who could help bring about a broad-based peace movement.

Religious groups have been almost unmatched in their ability to train activists and build social movements. In America, the most obvious recent example is the pro-life movement and the cultural warriors it has drawn from the pews of evangelical, Catholic, and other congregations. But the civil rights movement, too, acquired its power and breadth by filling the streets with churchgoing protesters, and filling its rhetoric with the biblical language of freedom, struggle, and redemption.

Closer to Home

Closer to Home

It's hard to think of another role with as much impact as being a mother and father. For almost every other position, we are replaceable in the long term. Someone else will do our job, for better or worse, if we're not there to do it. Someone else will eventually start our company or make our invention or sketch out our idea. Maybe it won't happen for a long time; maybe it would have happened earlier, if we weren't around to slow things down. But eventually, society makes progress, and the niches of innovation — in business or technology, art or politics — are filled.

The stories we're featuring on the site now touch upon the impact that fathers have — even in their absence. In Learned at My Father's Feet, Kae Dickson remembers her experience caring for her "Daddy" at the end of his life, as dementia robbed him of his memories and independence. In A Circle, Broken, Amy O'Loughlin reviews a family memoir by CNN journalist Mark Whitaker, who describes his complicated relationship with his absentee father, an African American scholar who blazed trails only to see his career burn out amid his struggles with alcoholism.

Lost Decades

Lost Decades

This week the magazine is featuring a trio of articles about prisons, real and psychological. In Freed, but Scarred, Francesca Crozier-Fitzgerald describes the post-prison lives of three men who spent, among them, forty-three years in New York penitentiaries for crimes they did not commit. In an accompanying photo essay, Life after Innocence, Dana Ullman presents intimate portraits of the three men and their families, still scarred by absences and regrets. Finally, in Across Oceans, Haunted by Memories, Susan M. Lee reviews the novel "The Reeducation of Cherry Truong," a tale of two Vietnamese families flung across the globe, chased by their war-era remembrances of traumas endured and wrongs perpetrated — at times, on each other.

The End of the Road

The End of the Road

Hitchhiking has become an anachronism in many parts of the world, along with the trust of strangers that makes it possible, but in The Road Less Traveled, Lita Wong hitches her way through rural Cuba and finds herself relying in unexpected ways on the kindness and decency of the people she meets on the road. Also check out Havel: An Authentic Life, Jan Vihan's essay on the plays of Vaclav Havel, the Czech statesman, revolutionary, and writer who died at the end of last year.